The Day Dr. King’s Dream Came True

* EDITOR’S NOTE: On the day that America inaugurates its’ first African-American president, we wanted to take you back in time…a little over a year ago…to the night of Senator Barack Obama’s first victory in the 2008 campaign.

After Obama won the Iowa Caucus, we published a piece titled “The Night Dr. King’s Dream Came True.” 

At the time, our prediction may have been a bit premature, but  now that the historic moment is truly upon us, we wanted to share this deeply moving story with you again. Penned by our Founding Editor New Frontier, it captures all of the hope, optimism and joy that people around the world are feeling today.

Congratulations to President Obama, Happy Birthday MLK, and God Bless America!

Signed, Sealed, Delivered,

— Tiger Haynes,

Managing Editor

I Have a Dream Today
“I Have a Dream Today”

“NOW IS THE TIME TO MAKE REAL THE PROMISES OF DEMOCRACY”

Dr. Martin Luther King, from his immortal “I Have A Dream” speech at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington, DC, August 28, 1963.

Barack Obama Victory Speech, Des moines, Iowa, January 3, 2008

“THEY SAID THIS DAY WOULD NEVER COME”

– Barack Obama, Victory Speech in Iowa, January 3, 2008

Last night, America changed forever — and for the better.

Last night, Democratic voters in Iowa shocked the world — and the political establishment.

Last night, 12 days before his birthday and in the 40th year since his assassination, the people of Iowa made Reverend Martin Luther King’s dream come true. They judged a man not by the color of his skin, but by the content of his character.

Last night, Iowa Democrats honored the highest ideals that President John F. Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy stood and fought for — the ideals that Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, Medgar Evers, and so many other lesser-known but equally brave Americans gave their lives for. They handed Senator Barack Obama a clear and decisive victory in the first caucus of the 2008 presidential race.

Last night, history was made, a massive milestone reached in what JFK once called the long twilight struggle. The struggle is far from over; we cannot for one moment forget the sacrifices it took to get us where we are — right now, right here in America.

Few under the age of 30 who were fortunate enough to grow up in a largely colorblind and desegregated society can imagine a time when their black brothers and sisters could not even sit beside them at a public lunch counter. Not so long ago in this country, a black American simply seeking to attend a state-run university had to be escorted in by federal troops after riots erupted in the streets. The very act of casting a vote was enough to put one’s safety in danger. In 1961 — the year Barack Obama was born — merely asserting a citizen’s right to travel subjected the Freedom Riders to brutal beatings, assault with firehoses, and the teeth of Bull Connor’s unforgiving, bloodthirsty police dogs.

Few of us over the age of 30 could have imagined the reality of an African-American man being a serious contender for President of the United States in our lifetimes. Few could honestly believe that in the American heartland, in a state whose population is nearly 95% white, Iowans would choose a black man as the candidate best qualified to lead our country.

But they did. And it’s wonderful. Somewhere, MLK is smiling. 

“WE ARE ONE PEOPLE. AND OUR TIME FOR CHANGE HAS COME.” – OBAMA

While Barack Obama is not the first black candidate to win a presidential primary (that honor goes to the Reverend Jesse Jackson, who won five primaries in 1984 and 11 contests in 1988), he has upped the stakes considerably. Jackson’s wins made history, but his long history as a civil rights activist unfortunately caused him to be labeled as a radical. Many said Jackson was too liberal, too polarizing a figure to be the party nominee, and gave him little hope of winning a general election. By contrast, Obama appeals to mainstream American voters of both parties, giving him a far better chance to compete in November.

Jackson, a former King aide, was standing beside him on the balcony of the Hotel Lorraine in Memphis when MLK was murdered. His presidential bids in `84 and `88 revived the spirit of Dr. King and this helped propel Jackson’s candidacy to victory in several primaries. Jackson carried mostly left-leaning states with large black populations (Louisiana, the District of Columbia, South Carolina, Virginia and Mississippi in 1984, adding Alabama, Georgia, Puerto Rico, Michigan, Delaware and Vermont four years later), and was considered a frontrunner for the Democratic nomination early in 1988.

Can it happen again? Can Obama do even better? Many believe that he can. What made his surprise win in Iowa so remarkable was not just the fact that he pulled it off in a a key early primary state which is almost all white, but the David-and-Goliath aspect of this race made his victory even more interesting. His opponent was a former first lady and the projected winner in nearly every pre-caucus poll. Jesse Jackson did not have to campaign against a former president (stumping for his wife) of his own party — and an incredibly powerful, well-financed political machine.

But perhaps the most critical difference of all is that Obama seems to be bringing the right message for the times in which we live. A message of hope, of change, of unity — and that this message is clearly striking a deep chord with America’s youth, who will be our future.

In his victory speech last night, Senator Obama spoke of hope winning over fear. “We are choosing unity over division and sending a powerful message that change is coming to America.

“We are not a collection of red states and blue states. We are the United States!” 

It doesn’t matter if Barack Obama is your candidate or not. At present, he is not my candidate. He is not Robert F. Kennedy Jr.’s candidate. What matters is the seismic change in American society and culture Obama’s victory last night represents. And that will reverberate forever.

Obama's day arrives

Caption: A New Day Dawns in America. Crowds began arriving before daybreak to celebrate the historic inauguration of Barack Obama as the 44th President of the United States. January 20, 2009. (CNN Photo)

© RFKJrforPresident.com. All Rights Reserved.

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Filed under barack obama, election 2008, JFK, John F. Kennedy, lyndon b. johnson, media, politics, president kennedy, religion, RFK, RFK Jr., robert f. kennedy, robert kennedy jr., senator robert kennedy, the kennedys, Uncategorized

2 responses to “The Day Dr. King’s Dream Came True

  1. Pingback: Maggie’s Blog » Blog Archive » The Day Dr. King’S Dream Came True « Robert F. Kennedy Jr. For …

  2. Dr. Martin Luther King’s Dream
    Is it really Barack Obama or has the dream yet to come? Who are the Negro People?

    As the new U.S President B. Obama touts about being the embodiment of the late DR. Martin Luther King dream for America, I can‘t help but wonder, who are the people DR. King is talking about when he speaks of the Negro People? Who are the Negro people?

    Has anyone taken the time to read and comprehend Dr. Martin Luther Kings I HAVE A DREAM speech, if they did they will notice there is no mention of African people, African struggle, African Americans.

    I Have a Dream states “One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languishing in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. So we have come here today to dramatize a shameful condition.”

    He only mentions the condition of the Negro people in their homeland of America and their relationship with the new nation of the United States. At some point in time a person reading this speech should want to clarify, “Who are the Negro People- the blacks as they are identified?” To answer these questions one needs to identify some facts.

    What does the term Negro signify? The term Negro people signify the Indigenous American people or Amerindians the colonial term used to represent them is Negro The Negro American race or black Americans represent the continuation of the remaining natural linage and bloodlines of the indigenous American People belonging the land of America before European invasion born from American Indian women. The founding father of the U.S established a new form of society on American soil. In this new society American Indian women and her descendants are used to SERVE as human commodity (slaves) people living in freedom(without their natural rights to self determination) but not being free (collective self determination) in the United States. Negro people represent the descendants from American Indian women or enslaved American Indians of America.

    He continues and speaks about the full citizenship promised by the U.S to all Negro people in their homeland, and reveals the fact the U.S has not kept its promise; he states the Negro People have received a “Bad Check”.

    “It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked “insufficient funds”

    What is the deal the United States made with the Negro leadership for the Negro people 1868. The U.S. promised “Citizenship” to the Negro people? If a person would do their research, they would find that the 1868 treaty with Abe Lincoln established the Union of the American Indian people as Negros with the United States and the continent of land belonging to the American Indian people was put in a land trust to be governed by the United States in exchange for American Indian people born from American Indian women were to receive full citizenship meaning the same rights as the people who enslaved them and self determination to develop themselves under this new nation umbrella.

    Understanding past U.S history explains why Dr. King ‘s dream of seeing an integrated society’s Negro and Euro-American people working as equals in this nation? The big secret is – The Negro People are the people who are allowing the Nation to exist, without their land there is no Nation, with out there peace there is “no prosperity of this Nation” He also threatened the Negro race of people will not rest until they have justice. In other words “NO Justice, NO Peace” All black American people can attest we are not treated equal nor are we treated equally or regarded as citizens,. In 2009 our people still languish on the out skirts of Euro-American society and the Marjory are captured and living in Prisons, our children live in extreme poverty, we lack collective employment as a nation we are on the brink of extinction. The difference today is Negro people as black American for generations have been forced and influence to assimilate into European attitudes and culture they have lost their connection to their ancestral American Indian culture and connection to their Natural homeland. As a result they lack respect, dignity, hope or direction.

    Now that some facts have been revealed, the question to ponder is how did the new elected African president become the ideal of DR. Martin Luther King and the Negro People? Or better yet Why is President Barack Obama a European and African decent immigrant being used to personify the dream of Martin Luther King for the Negro people in the Negro Homeland instead of a Negro president for the country that has yet to give them a GOOD check, Wouldn’t a Negro president show the world, the dream of Martin Luther King has for his people finally came to pass? The answer is President B. Obama does not represent Dr. King’s dream he had for the Negro People. President, B Obama represents a distortion of the Dream, and the Negro people are being Con out of their pants again by the Euro- American (U.S) society and (U.S) media at large.

    So exactly what is the semantics around Barack Obama? A European and African decent immigrant who is now a Negro Person, or are Negro people becoming Africa immigrants to their homeland thru identifying themselves with Barack Obama. Is there a national identity switch going on? Are the Negro people being duped out of the dept the United States owes them, the one DR. Martin Luther King spoke about? Are today’s Negro people being setup to be permmentily homeless people, with no place to be fruitful and multiply on the planet? If Negro or black American people become immigrants don’t they lose all there human and inalienable rights to live in the U.S, and lose their civil privileges by becoming immigrants to there homeland through identifying President Barack Obama as one of them? Yet he is a Kenyan African not an American Negro? Will this enable the U.S to destroy the dream of Martin Luther King and remove any claim the Negro people have in the Negro Homeland?

    LET’S SET THE RECORD STRAIGHT
    As a result, Negro people are being bamboozled again with a new perception that racism has stop in America against them, when in fact the systematic extermination of Negro people are filling up the jails and the graves, the only difference now is that they have a man named Barack Obama to cover over the crimes being committed against them and keep the people invisible and confused. It is a fact most black/Negro people lack education in their heritage, history, and most Negro women have been educated to have little respect for understanding their collective purpose as creators of the race and the sacred Grace we hold- it is woman that nature in trusts to continue their humanity as a valuable part of nature to the planet If they did they would not say they are black and they would understand B Obama is not the first Negro president and recognize and respect Michelle Obama is the first Negro woman in the White house and stand proud because her presence in the White House is a huge strike against the stigma from colonialism of Negro women as inferior woman, while our people understand that the struggle of equality represented by a Negro Man as president has yet to come part of Dr. Kings dream has started but yet to be completely fulfilled. It is up to us not to lose site of who we are and represent, our struggle is not over. It is time to recognize your indigenous identity.
    Don’t be fooled by the Hype

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